Chef’s Secrets: Grilled Flank Steak

By Chef Marcus Webster

Grilled flank steak is perfect as an entree, as a salad topping or as meat for tacos.

Grilled flank steak is perfect as an entree, as a salad topping or as meat for tacos.

Are you ready for another recipe?

I love the onset of warm weather, because warm weather = grilling season. In previous columns, if you remember, I reminisced about grilling with my dad in our native Arkansas. That was just what we did back then–head out and grill as soon as the weather starts sizzling.

So for this week, I would like to share another favorite original recipe of mine–flank steak. You can have it as an entrée, a salad topping or as the main ingredient for your taco bar. Now that’s the Californian in me talking!

I suggest using flank or flap meat because they are thicker and moister than skirt steak, which is usually really thin. There is a tool called a “jackar,” that is a meat tenderizer with lots of small and sharp metal spikes.

When used on meat, it helps break up the tendons and allows for a puree marinade to penetrate the meat with flavor. As an alternative, you can also just use a fork to penetrate halfway through the meat on one side.

Ready, set, grill!

Grilled Flank Steak

Ingredients:

3 lbs. flank, flap or skirt steak (trimmed and washed)

4 garlic cloves

½ yellow onion

1/3 cup cilantro, chopped

3 tbsp. chili powder

1 tbsp. cumin

2 tbsp. brown sugar

1 tbsp. fresh oregano

½ cup Modelo beer

½ cup lime juice

¼ cup olive oil

1 tbsp. Kosher salt

1 tsp. coarse black pepper

The secret to great grilled flank steak is in the marinade.

The secret to great grilled flank steak is in the marinade.

Procedure:

1)    Combine all ingredients in a blender and puree.

2)   Using ¾ of the puree, rub it all over the steak and let “marry” for four hours in the fridge or overnight, for best results. Set aside the remaining ¼ of the puree to use for basting the meat on the grill.

3)    Spray or use a little oil on a hot charcoal grill or flat top kamal (a flat cast iron griddle).

4)    Sear meat for about 10 minutes per side for medium rare results. Also consider the thickness of the meat. So sear longer for thicker meat and less for thinner meat.

5)    Leave on longer if you prefer a little more medium meat. Do not overcook. Use a probe thermometer to check for internal temperature, which should be 135 degrees.

6)    Let the meat rest for 10 minutes before slicing. This grade of meat is best when cut thinly against the grain on a slight bias.

7)    Enjoy on a salad, as an entree or use as meat for tacos!

Chef Marcus Webster has been a professional chef for over 20 years, starting as a private chef before becoming a corporate chef at the Thousand Oaks-based Auctions in Motion. He is currently the executive chef for NAWLINZ Bistro in downtown Oxnard and Conejo Valley Catering, the catering arm of NAWLINZ Bistro 


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